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Paul J. Reber, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Psychology
Northwestern University

Head of the Brain, Behavior and Cognition Program at NU Psych

Link to Faculty page at Northwestern University Psychology Department

A Wordle based on my current CV (Aug 2011) which seems like a surprisingly good snapshot.

Professional interests

Cognitive neuroscience of memory; neurological basis of memory systems; neuroimaging, experimental and computational approaches to understanding memory throughout the brain.

 

 

Professional Experience

Sept. 2004-Present Associate Professor of Psychology, Northwestern UniversityFellow, Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Northwestern University Medical School.
Member, Northwestern University Institute for Neuroscience
1998-2004 Assistant Professor of Psychology, Northwestern University
1997-1998 Cognitive Neuroscience Research Fellow, Magnetic Resonance Institute &
Department of Psychiatry, University of California at San Diego.
1993-1997 Post-doctoral fellow with Larry R. Squire, Ph.D., Department of Psychiatry
University of California at San Diego.

Education

1989-1993 Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Psychology
1984‑1988 B.S. Eng in Computer Science, University of Pennsylvania, Moore School of Electrical Engineering

 

Academic CV (Aug 2012)

Post-doctoral position available

By Paul, Category News

Enhancing Intuitive Decision Making through Implicit Learning We are looking for a post-doctoral researcher to contribute to a new ONR funded project that will use computational modeling and fMRI to examine intuitive decision making.  Using our PINNACLE framework, we will build computational simulation models of cognitive processing that depends on interactions between implicit and explicit …

The Man Who Would Teach Machines to Think

By Paul, Category Reber's Randomness

Good article on Cognitive Science versus Artificial Intelligence in the Atlantic from a few weeks ago. http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/11/the-man-who-would-teach-machines-to-think/309529/ Douglas Hofstadter, the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Gödel, Escher, Bach, thinks we’ve lost sight of what artificial intelligence really means. His stubborn quest to replicate the human mind. This is the key point, in my opinion: “I don’t …

Neuroscience and video game skill learning

By Paul, Category Reber's Randomness

I wrote a short piece for a gaming-oriented online magazine, GLHF (Good Luck, Have Fun!) talking about the neuroscience of skill learning and how it applies to getting better at even things like video games.  The magazine is generally focused on Starcraft2 and the professional e-sports scene around Starcraft (although I think they want to …

Brain training by Starcraft

By Paul, Category Reber's Randomness

Can’t believe I didn’t Randomness this one already… Real-Time Strategy Game Training: Emergence of a Cognitive Flexibility Trait Brian D. Glass, W. Todd Maddox, & Bradley C. Love http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0070350 The main finding: increased cognitive flexibility after 40 hours of playing Starcraft.  Of note, the assessment of cognitive flexibility was done by meta-analytic Bayes factor across …

Implicit Learning Review

By Paul, Category News

The review paper for Neuropsychologia is officially available. Memory systems research has typically described the different types of long-term memory in the brain as either declarative versus non-declarative or implicit versus explicit. These descriptions reflect the difference between declarative, conscious, and explicit memory that is dependent on the medial temporal lobe (MTL) memory system, and …

Brain Training by BrainAge

By Paul, Category Reber's Randomness

Brain Training in PLoS One: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0055518 Brain Training Game Boosts Executive Functions, Working Memory and Processing Speed in the Young Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial Rui Nouchi, Yasuyuki Taki, Hikaru Takeuchi, Hiroshi Hashizume,Takayuki Nozawa, Toshimune Kambara, Atsushi Sekiguchi, Carlos Makoto Miyauchi, Yuka Kotozaki, Haruka Nouchi, Ryuta Kawashima The title seems to accurately tell the results …

Learning a short, timed, motor sequence

By Paul, Category Reber's Randomness

I stumbled across the “cup song” by Anna Kendrick (from the movie Pitch Perfect, also performed by her on Letterman and originally learned from a “viral video” which sources to a homemade youtube video by Lulu and the Lampshades).  The trick is singing a short song while tapping out a short percussion sequence using a …

Paranormal activity

By Paul, Category Reber's Randomness

I did a short interview with an Australian radio show called Ghosts of Oz, hosted by Danni Remali, on Saturday night.  The show focuses on paranormal topics and they wanted to talk about deja vu — they found me by the Scientific American AskTheBrains column.  They assured me that they wanted a real scientific perspective …

By Paul, Category Accepted

Gobel, E.W., Blomeke, K., Zadikoff, C., Simuni, T., Weintraub, S., Reber, P.J. (in press).  Implicit perceptual-motor skill learning in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Parkinson’s disease.  Neuropsychology. Abstract Objective: Implicit skill learning is hypothesized to depend on nondeclarative memory that operates independent of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) memory system and instead depends on cortico-striatal circuits …

#overlyhonestmethods

By Paul, Category Reber's Randomness

So apparently a new hastag, #overlyhonestmethods, is burning up the twitterverse.  It appears to be driven by students, technicians, post-docs in science labs blowing off steam about the challenges of doing research.  It’s funny and probably a good thing in the overall sociology of science — I think.  It is a good thing if it …

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