Category Archive: Accepted

Check out our recently published papers.

Mar 04

Ego Depletion Impairs Implicit Learning

Thompson, K. R., Sanchez, D. J., Wesley, A. H., & Reber, P. J. (2014). Ego Depletion Impairs Implicit Learning. PloS one, 9(10), e109370. Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources during …

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Feb 11

(No title)

Gobel, E.W., Blomeke, K., Zadikoff, C., Simuni, T., Weintraub, S., Reber, P.J. (in press).  Implicit perceptual-motor skill learning in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Parkinson’s disease.  Neuropsychology. Abstract Objective: Implicit skill learning is hypothesized to depend on nondeclarative memory that operates independent of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) memory system and instead depends on cortico-striatal circuits …

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Nov 09

Explicit pre-training instruction does not improve implicit perceptual-motor sequence learning

Sanchez, D.J. & Reber, P.J. (2013). Explicit pre-training instruction does not improve implicit perceptual-motor sequence learning. Cognition, 126(3), 341-351. Memory systems theory argues for separate neural systems supporting implicit and explicit memory in the human brain. Neuropsychological studies support this dissociation, but empirical studies of cognitively healthy participants generally observe that both kinds of memory …

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Dec 14

Neuroscience Meets Cryptography: Designing Crypto Primitives Secure Against Rubber Hose Attacks

Bojinov, H., Sanchez, D., Reber, P., Boneh, D., & Lincoln, P. (2012). Neuroscience meets cryptography: Designing crypto primitives secure against rubber hose attacks. Paper presented at the 21st USENIX Security Symposium. Cryptographic systems often rely on the secrecy of cryptographic keys given to users. However, many schemes cannot resist coercion attacks where the user is …

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Feb 07

Operating Characteristics of the Implicit Learning System supporting Serial Interception Sequence Learning

Sanchez, D.J. & Reber, P.J. (2012). Operating characteristics of the implicit learning system supporting serial interception sequence learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 38(2), 439-452. The memory system that supports implicit perceptual-motor sequence learning relies on brain regions that operate separately from the explicit, medial temporal lobe memory system. The implicit learning …

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Feb 01

Neural Correlates of Skill Acquisition: Decreased Cortical Activity During a Serial Interception Sequence Learning Task

Gobel, E.W., Parrish, T.B., & Reber, P.J. (2011). NeuroImage. Learning of complex motor skills requires learning of component movements as well as the sequential structure of their order and timing. Using a Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task, participants learned a sequence of precisely timed interception responses through training with a repeating sequence. Functional MRI …

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Aug 30

Integration of Temporal and Ordinal Information During Serial Interception Sequence Learning

Gobel, E. W., Sanchez, D. J., & Reber, P. J. (2011). Integration of temporal and ordinal knowledge during serial interception sequence learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 37(4), 994-1000. The expression of expert motor skills typically involves learning to perform a precisely timed sequence of movements (e.g., language production, music performance, athletic …

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Mar 04

Performing the unexplainable: Implicit task performance reveals individually reliable sequence learning without explicit knowledge

Sanchez, D. J., Gobel, E. W., & Reber, P. J. (2010). Performing the unexplainable: Implicit task performance reveals individually reliable sequence learning without explicit knowledge. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 17(6), 790-796. Memory-impaired patients express intact implicit perceptual-motor sequence learning, but it has been difficult to obtain a similarly clear dissociation in healthy participants. When explicit …

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