Kati

Author's details

Name: Kati Gigler
Date registered: September 15, 2010

Latest posts

  1. Cognitive Neuroscience Society 2014 — November 30, 2013
  2. Entertainment Software and Cognitive Neurotherapeutics Society (Los Angeles, 2013) — January 24, 2013
  3. This Is (Some Scientific Research About) Your Brain On Video Games — November 28, 2012
  4. Society for Neuroscience 2012 (New Orleans, LA) — May 17, 2012
  5. Working memory capacity increases for structured sequences covertly embedded in practice — May 12, 2012

Author's posts listings

Nov 30

Cognitive Neuroscience Society 2014

Investigating interactions between working memory and long-term memory systems using the Hebb repetition effect K.L. Gigler & P.J Reber Long-term working memory (LTWM) reflects an interaction between working memory (WM) and long-term memory (LTM) systems in which effective WM capacity is expanded for experts due to knowledge representations in LTM. In the laboratory, this interaction …

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Jan 24

Entertainment Software and Cognitive Neurotherapeutics Society (Los Angeles, 2013)

Extending the analogy between cognitive and physical training with implicit learning as the mechanism behind cognitive strengthening Kathryn L. Gigler, Samantha Stores & Paul J. Reber Proponents of cognitive training are often criticized for lack of knowledge of a mechanism by which transfer of training gains occurs. We suggest implicit learning as a mechanism for …

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Nov 28

This Is (Some Scientific Research About) Your Brain On Video Games

http://www.ted.com/talks/daphne_bavelier_your_brain_on_video_games.html Here’s a recent talk by Daphne Bauvelier (University of Rochester) on brain plasticity & video game playing. I’m not usually a huge TED fan, but this is actually a decent neuroscience one, it seems. Positive press from the online neuroscience community, too, which is neat. Hopefully such discussion fuels further research talk on the …

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May 17

Society for Neuroscience 2012 (New Orleans, LA)

Computerized cognitive training leads to working memory and processing speed improvements in older adults Gigler, K.L., Blomeke, K., Weintraub, S. & Reber, P.J. Recently there has been significant interest in interventions designed to slow or prevent cognitive decline in older adults. The current study used the Cognifit┬« online training program in order to explore the …

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May 12

Midwestern Psychological Association 2012 (Chicago, IL)

Transfer of working memory training gains to other cognitive functions Gigler, K.L. & Reber, P.J. Problem/Major Purpose: Recent research demonstrating improvements in working memory (WM) capacity has challenged the idea that WM capacity is an immutable cognitive trait. Indeed, relatively modest training protocols have been shown to lead to significant improvement. Because WM is a …

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May 12

Cognitive Aging 2012 (Atlanta, GA)

Working memory intervention training in young and older adults Gigler, K.L. & Reber, P.J. Cognitive training to slow or reverse age-related cognitive decline is based on the premise that core cognitive functions can be strengthened by challenging, repetitive practice. A good candidate cognitive process for improvement is working memory (WM), which supports effective problem solving, …

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Nov 02

Cognitive Neuroscience Society 2012 (Chicago, IL)

Working memory training gains and transfer to other cognitive functions Gigler, K.L. & Reber, P.J. Recent research demonstrating improvements in working memory (WM) capacity has challenged the idea that WM capacity is an immutable cognitive trait. Indeed, relatively modest training protocols have been shown to lead to significant improvement. Because WM is a core cognitive …

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Nov 02

Entertainment Software and Cognitive Neurotherapeutics Society 2011 (San Francisco, CA)

Sequence-specific and non-specific gains in working memory following cognitive training Gigler, K.L. & Reber, P.J. Working memory (WM) refers to the ability to hold a limited amount of information in mind for a short period of time and is a core cognitive component important for many higher-level cognitive functions, including problem solving and language comprehension. …

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Nov 02

Society for Neuroscience 2011 (Washington D.C.)

Training on a game-like working memory task can improve visuo-spatial working memory capacity Gigler, K.L. & Reber, P.J. The question of transfer has emerged in studies of cognitive training that have found improvements in the trained cognitive processes, but inconsistent transfer of these improvements to other cognitive functions. Similar findings exist in the working memory …

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